HybridConf, 2014

I’m just back from attending HybridConf, a 2-day web design/development conference in Stockholm. It was my first time in the city, and I found it strangely underwhelming. I don’t know whether spending so much time in Amsterdam has spoiled me when it comes to stunning architecture, but Stockholm just felt like it could be any of a dozen anonymous British cities, albeit with a lot more umlauts and street corner beggars.

The conference itself, in its second year and transplanted from Bath by organisers Laura Sanders and Zach Inglis, was excellent. The relatively small attendee count gave it an intimate feel, and the venue – the historic Rigoletto cinema – made this probably the most comfortable conference I’ve ever attended. Perhaps half of the audience were Swedish, with the rest travelling from all around Europe. There were even a few Americans present, and they in particular must have felt at home, as almost three-quarters of the speakers were from the US.

I and co-worker Erin Weigel managed to catch just about every talk; I particularly enjoyed Dan Rubin‘s opening talk about team communication (and it closely matched how we run our teams at Booking.com), and Scott Hanselman managed to be both funny and informative despite having to fit in a second unplanned appearance on stage to stand in for the missing Sara Chipps. But the highlights of the two days were both delivered by people building actual real things. Tom Soderstrom, CTA of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, gave us an insight into the sort of work going on there, and how they apply startup culture and thinking within one of the world’s most expensive projects.

Then on Friday, GitHub’s Andrew Nesbitt tempted the live demo gods by wiring together an Arduino-powered, joystick-controlled ball live on stage. I was only slightly disappointed that he didn’t attempt to feed his rabbit live over the internet.

We were of course there as sponsors in our ongoing quest to hire the entire world, and it’s good to hear during the many conversations I had with other attendees that A/B testing and experimentation is becoming a lot more of a mainstream aspect of modern web design and development. We’ve become something of a fixture at web conferences now, and people are much more aware of what we’re doing and how we work. We had sponsored Experience Design Stockholm‘s event the previous evening, where Erin had delivered a great talk on experimentation that was also well-received; I think it’s strange that more large companies aren’t using this route to directly mingle with our industry’s top talent and promote themselves as maybe being that potential next job.

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