Monthly Archives: September 2013

Coursera – Online Games: Literature, New Media and Narrative

Continuing my ongoing adventures in free online education, this month I embarked on my fifth Coursera course. Online Games: Literature, New Media and Narrative is a six week course run by Nashville’s Vanderbilt University that aims to explore “remediation” — the transplanting of one form of media into another — via the book-to-film-to-game transition of the ‘world’s greatest work of literature’, JRR Tolkien’s The Lord Of The Rings.

Students (more than 40,000 of them according to this Penny Arcade piece) are assigned both reading and in-game assignments in addition to the pre-recorded video lectures delivered by enthusiastic nerd-in-chief, Jay Clayton. It is fascinating watching experienced gamers and those totally new to any kind of computer game, let alone the complexity of an MMORPG, working and learning alongside each other in the course forums and online. Many established LOTRO players are incredibly generous with their time and resources, supplying new classmates with enhanced items and organising special sessions to achieve in-game rewards.

So far we’re only on Week 1. I’ve re-read The Fellowship Of The Ring, and re-watched Peter Jackson’s film of the same name (and bored my wife by pointing out all the discrepancies between the two); Discelas the Elf has reached level 16 and met Tom Bombadil, and I’m all set for another five weeks of relaxed study.

Lapsed Gamer

After such a long break from my semi-serious Warcraft days, it’s strange to be back playing an MMO again. The seductively easy gameplay and progression in LOTRO is not quite as seamless as WoW, but the addition of the background mythos and characters from Lord Of The Rings provides an added depth and impetus to carry on playing through the main questline, a key aspect of the game that WoW conspicuously lacks.

It has reminded me of the reasons I gave up playing WoW, though (and subsequently EVE Online, Warhammer, Defiance, and one or two others). The constant “live”-ness of the game world, and lack of a Pause button, elevates the action in the game to the importance of real life; you can’t turn away from the game for a second to speak to a child or kiss a partner, and the further you progress in the game, the more this anti-social monkey on your back demands attention, and for longer and longer periods of time.

Add to that the lack of any real-world output after countless hours of effort, and you have a recipe for a wasted life. I gave it up to concentrate on making something tangible, and I think I’m happier for it.

dConstruct 2013

Don't worry we're from the internet

Summer is over, the rain has returned, and the kids have gone back to school … which means it must be time for another dConstruct conference, in the UK’s alternately sunny and rain-drenched south coast hipster mecca: Brighton.

dConstruct’s relevance to the web seems to become more oblique with each passing year. This year’s theme, “Communicating with machines,” promised a day of “exploration and entertainment.” My employer Booking.com was sponsoring the conference for the first time, but those of us attending for the purposes of recruitment were also lucky enough to be able to watch many of the sessions. Here are some of my highlights.

Of Cyborgs, Toast & Gay Vulcans

Amber Case, also occasionally known as: “Hey, look, someone’s actually wearing Google Glass!”, started the day with a look back at the work that she has done with her startup Geoloqi in the field of ambiently location-aware applications. She and her team have done much in the real-world equivalent of Minority Report’s imagined individual-aware notifications, although hers were mostly confined to pushing interesting wiki information at users rather than advertising. Her look at the history of wearable computing was interesting, though, taking in the work done by Steve Mann and the MIT Borg Squad and the designers who, many years later, would go on to ship Google Glass.

Simone Rebaudengo’s talk was a fascinating exploration that asked what our digitally connected devices might actually want from their owners. His socially-aware toaster experiment — wherein networked toasters bugged their owners to make more toast both through online activity and actual knob-jiggling physical prompts — was brilliantly conceived, and even if the result has little obvious practical application, it prompts interesting thought about how more socially beneficial activities can be encouraged through a subtle combination of positive and negative reinforcement.

Musician Sarah Angliss discussed uncanny sound by way of the Uncanny Valley. Her talk took in music over the last several hundred years, digital versus analogue performance, and ended with a haunting theremin-and-talking-dolls-head performance of her music.

Maciej Ceglowski, the man behind Pinboard, delivered a deliciously funny insight into the world of fan- and slash-fiction. From his admitted initial mockery of the largely female community and their homo-erotic copyright-busting short stories, he explained how he came to appreciate their boundless enthusiasm and love for their community, and his examples of the lengths to which they would go to improve and maintain the tools they love provides an optimistic counterpoint to the usual mindless trollery of many online communities such as YouTube commenters.

Speaking of YouTube comment trolls, the day was closed out by comedian Adam Buxton taking a rambling look at things he did with his laptop. His question was allegedly: “Is my laptop ruining my life,” but from that starting point Buxton managed to encompass kittens with breasts, Garage Band, motivational quote websites, and of course his now-familiar descent into the strange world of YouTube commenting. With the audience in hysterics, he concluded that perhaps his laptop was not ruining his life after all… and with that, we all shut our laptops and went to the bar.

A word from our sponsors

dConstruct’s unique approach to ‘web’ conferences draws a much more diverse crowd than you might normally encounter, and the affordable price contributes to that diversity. Despite that, we still managed to talk to many designers and developers about the roles we’re looking to fill at our Amsterdam head office, and I’m happy to hear that our presence at these kinds of conferences is starting to become familiar and welcomed by delegates. We’re not a recruitment agency, as one confused delegate seemed to think; we are the designers you could be working alongside, and it’s great to have the opportunity to get out and share our enthusiasm with potential future colleagues. If you didn’t get the chance to come and chat to us during the conference, we’re always happy to talk — seek us out on Twitter or visit booking.com/jobs for all the details.